Perl Survey 2007 data released

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Attention all trend-finders and part-time statisticians: The results of the Perl Survey 2007 are now available.

Michael Schwern presented a basic analysis of the results were recapped at Pittsburgh Perl Workshop this past weekend, and I'm still trying to get a summary to post here. Skud is also working on her own analysis of the data, and will post it to the Perl Survey results page.

No need to wait for them, though. We encourage you to do your own analysis of the data, and tell us and the world what you think it means. The data is released under a Creative Commons license, and I've created Data::PerlSurvey2007 to give you a quick & dirty way to slurp up the data into Perl code and have fun trying to find your own correlations and interesting insights.

It's simple code. It just slurps up the .csv file available on perlsurvey.org (and also included with the distro) and gives you an array of hashrefs for each completed response. They look like this:

    {
      'Attended Perl Mongers' => '1',
      'Attended Perl Mongers (non-local)' => '0',
      'Attended conference' => '1',
      'Attended conference (non-local)' => '0',
      'CPAN modules maintained' => '12',
      'Contributed to CPAN' => '1',
      'Contributed to Perl 5' => '0',
      'Contributed to Perl 6' => '0',
      'Contributed to other projects' => '1',
      'Contributed to websites' => '1',
      'Country of birth' => 'au',
      'Country of residence' => 'au',
      'Date survey completed' => '2007-07-26 12:49:37',
      'ID' => '25',
      'Income' => '80000-89999',
      'Industry/ies' => [
                          'Internet',
                          'Real Estate'
                        ],
      'Led other projects' => '1',
      'Other programming languages known' => [],
      'Perl versions' => [
                           '5.005',
                           '5.6.1',
                           '5.8.4',
                           '5.8.5',
                           '5.8.8'
                         ],
      'Perlmonks' => '0',
      'Platforms' => [
                       'BSD - FreeBSD',
                       'Linux - Debian',
                       'Linux - Ubuntu',
                       'Mac OS/X',
                       'Windows XP'
                     ],
      'Posted to Perl Mongers list' => '1',
      'Posted to other list' => '1',
      'Presented at conference' => '1',
      'Primary language spoken' => 'English',
      'Programming languages known' => [
                                         'JavaScript',
                                         'MOO',
                                         'PHP',
                                         'Ruby'
                                       ],
      'Proportion of Perl' => '90',
      'Provided feedback' => '1',
      'Sex' => 'female',
      'Subscribed to Perl Mongers list' => '1',
      'Subscribed to other list' => '1',
      'Year of birth' => '1975',
      'Years programming (total)' => '22',
      'Years programming Perl' => '11'
    },

Nuthin' fancy, but I hope this gives people a starting point without having to worry about the mundane parts of slurping up CSV files.

1 TrackBack

Take note, all you aspiring statisticians! The Perl survey data has been released and it's time to get to work. I expect nothing less than a horde of different and interesting break-downs and mashups in the coming weeks, so to get things rollin... Read More

2 Comments

Wow, I really like the idea of open sourced survey results. For something like this, I'm not sure it makes a huge difference (we'll see); but if the idea catches on it could open data that does...

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