Tools: March 2008 Archives

Just in case anyone's using Plucene as a search engine, please don't. It's terribly slow. Take a look at KinoSearch instead. Plucene is written in pure Perl, mostly as a proof of concept. It is literally orders of magnitude slower than KinoSearch, which uses C for the hard bits. Here's a page of benchmarks to make the point.

ack 1.78 is out

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After three months of lots of development work and intermediate releases, I've released ack 1.78. There are tons of new features and lots of compatibility fixes for Windows. ack is a replacement for grep that is geared to working with trees of code.

Highlights in this release include:

  • Files specified on the command line are always searched, even if they don't match a known filetype
  • Ability to ignore directories
  • Pager support
  • More flexible grouping options
  • Many more languages recognized and existing ones improved, including CFMX, Actionscript, assembly, Tcl, Lisp, Smalltalk
  • Ability to define your own languages based on filetype

ack may well change the way you work on the command-line with source code. Try it out and let me know what you think. You can install it by installing App::Ack from CPAN, or downloading the standalone version to your ~/bin directory.

I just now had to clean up some tables in a PostgreSQL database. The prior DBA thought that it would be good to split up tables into lx1, lx2, lx3 up to lx20. After I combined all the tables together, I needed to drop the originals. I could have written a Perl program to generate a series of drop table lx1; commands to feed into the psql command-line client, but instead I used the seq tool:

$ seq -f'drop table lx%g;' 1 20
drop table lx1;
drop table lx2;
...
drop table lx20;

If you don't have seq on your system, as on Mac OS X, you probably have jot, as in:

jot -w'drop table lx%g;' 20 1

Then again, if you just have to do it in Perl:

perl -le'print qq{drop table lx$_;} for 1..20'

but I like to use other tools than the Swiss Army Chainsaw sometimes.

Adam Kaplan has released a cool new profiling tool, Devel::NYTProf. It's apparently taken the formatting beauty of Devel::Cover, the code test coverage tool, and used it to identify hotspots in your code. The results are beautiful: Overview and module-level detail. There's also a report writer that provides CSV output and lets you create your own output in your own format.

I ran into a divide-by-zero error that I patched in my local copy, but other than that the results seem good. I look forward to whatever other improvements come. I'm also glad it's been released with the support of the New York Times.

About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Tools category from March 2008.

Tools: February 2008 is the previous archive.

Tools: April 2008 is the next archive.

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